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Article
August 1947

AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM AND ACTION OF DRUGS IMPORTANT IN OPHTHALMOLOGY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pharmacology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;38(2):145-153. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00900010150001
Abstract

THE IMPORTANCE of the autonomic nervous system needs little emphasis. It regulates the essential involuntary activities of the body. These include such varied functions as respiration, the circulation of the blood, digestion, metabolism, heat regulation and control of glands of internal secretions so far as these are under nervous control. If the acetylcholine theory of neuromyal transmission is completely adopted, even the voluntary musculature can be considered closely related to the autonomic nervous system. For an understanding of the pharmacology of autonomic drugs important in ophthalmology, it seems desirable to include a discussion of the general pharmacology of the whole autonomic system, in or from which, according to modern theory, nerve impulses are transmitted by a humoral mechanism. The transmitting substances are believed to be acetylcholine (synaptic transmission in the central nervous system [?] and in all autonomic ganglions; neuromyal transmission in striated muscle; transmission from postganglionic parasympathetic fibers to effector

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