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Article
August 1947

SOFT GLAUCOMA AND CALCIFICATION OF THE INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERIES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery, the New York Hospital and Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;38(2):154-158. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00900010159002
Abstract

SINCE Fuchs's1 paper in 1911, cases have been described with atrophy of the optic nerve, suggestive glaucomatous cupping and loss of visual field. The condition in these cases resembles chronic glaucoma but does not show elevation of intraocular pressure. It has been described by such terms as "soft glaucoma" and "glaucoma without hypertension."

In 1932 Knapp2 reviewed the literature on this subject and described 10 cases of his own. All his cases were characterized by atrophy of the optic nerve with shallow cupping, defects of the visual fields which tended toward altitudinal hemianopsia and persistently normal tension. He was able to demonstrate roentgenographically calcification of the arteries at the base of the brain in all 10 cases. In 9 of these cases the internal carotid arteries were involved, either with or without involvement of other vessels in that region. He concluded that "the roentgen findings, not as yet

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