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Article
September 1947

OCULAR CHANGES IN RATS ON DIETS DEFICIENT IN AMINO ACIDSII. Corneal Dystrophy Due to Valine Deficiency

Author Affiliations

With the Technical Assistance of Morgan Worthy NEW YORK
From the Department of Neuropathology, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;38(3):342-352. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00900010351006
Abstract

OSBORNE and Mendel1 were among the first investigators to demonstrate experimentally that some amino acids, although required only in a minimum amount, are essential to the life and development of animals. Their experiments were later confirmed by various authors, particularly Rose2 and co-workers,3 who established more definitely that of the twenty-two most important amino acids ten are absolutely essential to growing animals and eight are necessary for the maintenance of the nitrogen equilibrium in adult man. However, not enough attention was paid to possible structural involvement of the various tissues and organs in the absence of the specific amino acids. In more recent papers, Albanese and co-workers,4 Buschke,5 Maun and associates6 and we7 reported various structural changes associated with diets deficient in tryptophan,8 lysine,4b phenylalanine,6a leucine6b and histidine.6c

In the report on rats maintained on tryptophan-deficient diets,7

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