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Article
November 1947

USE OF ABSORBABLE CORNEOSCLERAL SUTURES IN CATARACT SURGERYReport of Seventy-Six Cases

Author Affiliations

GRAND FORKS, N. D.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;38(5):665-667. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00900010682007
Abstract

REMOVAL of sutures after cataract extraction has always presented a difficult problem. In removing the sutures, not only does one subject the eye to the hazard of rupturing the wound; one subjects the patient to an ordeal which he seems to dread almost as much as the original operation.

Anyone who uses corneoscleral sutures has been fortunate indeed if while removing these sutures he has never had the experience of rupturing the wound sufficiently to produce a hemorrhage into the anterior chamber. A number of good ophthalmic surgeons condemn altogether the use of corneoscleral sutures because of the hazards which they present on removal.

It is not surprising that recently several physicians have made an attempt to solve this problem by the use of absorbable sutures. Davis1 reported the use of absorbable corneoscleral sutures in 70 cases of cataract extraction. Hughes, Guy and Romaine2 reported a series of

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