[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1947

OCULAR INJURY DUE TO SULFUR DIOXIDEI. Report of Four Cases

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;38(6):755-761. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00900010774002
Abstract

SULFUR dioxide in high concentration in the form of the liquefied gas commonly used in domestic refrigerators is an occasional cause of serious ocular injury. Accidental spraying of liquefied sulfur dioxide into the eyes of persons working on refrigeration machines has in some instances permanently reduced vision to light perception through production of corneal opacification and vascularization. The manner in which sulfur dioxide causes such severe damage is conjectural. In the present report, 4 cases of ocular injury due to sulfur dioxide are described, and in a subsequent report an experimental study will be presented aimed toward an elucidation of the means by which sulfur dioxide causes the damage.

Several previous descriptions of ocular injury due to liquid sulfur dioxide have been presented. A report of an accident involving squirting of liquid sulfur dioxide into the face was given by Kennon1 (1927), who noted recovery of 20/15 vision following

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×