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Article
December 1947

CHRONIC TEARING CURED BY REESTABLISHMENT OF NORMAL TEAR CONDUCTION PASSAGES

Author Affiliations

Assistant Attending in Otolaryngology at the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital BROOKLYN

Arch Ophthalmol. 1947;38(6):775-795. doi:10.1001/archopht.1947.00900010794004
Abstract

CHRONIC tearing of the eye is usually due to abnormality of the tear conduction passages. These passages consist of (1) the eyelids; (2) the puncta and canaliculi, and (3) the tear sac, its prolongation downward into the nasolacrimal duct and that portion of the nose into which the nasolacrimal duct drains.

Chronic irritation arising from refractive errors and muscular imbalance occasionally causes chronic tearing. Psychic, glandular or reflex factors are infrequently involved. In cases of the latter type, a drop of an innocuous colored solution, e. g., 1 per cent fluorescein sodium, placed in each eye will be quickly transmitted into the nose. The comparative speed with which each eye so clears itself measures the efficiency of the tear-conducting apparatus of each eye. The presence, as well as the concentration, of the colored solution can be gaged by blowing each side of the nose separately into a paper tissue. A

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