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Article
January 1948

NEUROLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE OF LATERAL CONJUGATE DEVIATION OF THE EYES ON FORCED CLOSURE OF THE LIDS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;39(1):37-42. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900020040004
Abstract

IT IS the purpose of the present communictaion to note and evaluate a diagnostic sign which, although described several decades ago (in 1913, almost simultaneously by Prezzolini1 and Bárány2), has received scant attention3 in the subsequent literature. The sign, a variant of Bell's phenomenon, consists of a lateral conjugate deviation of the eyes on forced closure of the lids occurring in persons with intracranial disease.

After establishing the frequency of the sign in a series of persons with no known neurologic disease, observations were made on a group of approximately 200 persons with intracranial or labyrinthine lesions. Also noted were any evidence of paresis of conjugate gaze and any abnormality in the opticokinetic response. Eliminated from the series were patients with probable bilateral lesions of the central nervous system or the labyrinth, patients observed only in coma or only after operation (except when the operation was a

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