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Article
January 1948

CORRELATIONS BETWEEN SENSORY AND MOTOR DISTURBANCES IN CONVERGENT SQUINT

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;39(1):98. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900020101013

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —Dr. Linksz is quite correct in stating that we have tabulated 80 per cent of the patients who did not have normal correspondence but who had suppression under the heading of "anomalous correspondence." We are in agreement with Dr. Linksz that this is an unfortunate term to use for this group, but no better one has been agreed on and the subject is still extremely controversial. Lancaster, Harms, Travers and Burian all classify this group of patients with those in whom anomalous correspondence can be proved with the major amblyoscope. Swan, Linksz and others object to the definition of "anomalous correspondence" as a condition in which the fovea of one retina and an eccentric element of the other acquire a common visual direction, since such a functional relation can be demonstrated in so few patients with anomalous retinal correspondence.In the 80 per cent of patients with suppression, there is

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