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Article
February 1948

SPONTANEOUS ABSORPTION OF CONGENITAL CATARACT FOLLOWING MATERNAL RUBELLA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the service of Dr. Edward Bellamy Gresser at the Beth Israel Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;39(2):205-209. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900020210007
Abstract

THE OCCURRENCE of cataract and other congenital defects in infants born to mothers who had rubella during the early part of the gestation period has become well known in the few years since 1942, when Gregg1 first noted the connection in Australia and Reese2 published the original American report two years later. Although various other ocular defects, especially microphthalmos, nystagmus and glaucoma, have been frequently noted, little attention has been paid to another, most interesting finding in a few of the eyes.

Some of these cataracts have been needled, but, surprisingly, only a thin membrane was found, dividing readily as a result of the instrumentation originally intended solely to open the anterior capsule and expose the lens fibers to the action of the aqueous.

Gamble3 was the first to report such a membranous cataract. In 1945 he described the case of a baby girl who when first

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