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Article
March 1948

USE OF COATED LENSES IN RETINOSCOPY

Author Affiliations

SAN PEDRO, CALIF.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;39(3):383-385. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900020390012
Abstract

RECENT experience in reduction of reflection on coated camera and spectacle lenses suggested the use of coated trial case lenses1 in retinoscopy. The earlier work on coating of lenses, according to Graham,2 was done by Dennis Taylor, in England, as early as 1892. He observed that the layer of dust or discoloration which appeared on old camera lenses did not reduce the light they transmitted but tended to increase it. It also reduced reflection. Taylor endeavored to reproduce the effect of age but was unable to get a coating with a wavelength necessary to intercept the incident light so as to counteract its effect. However, Strong, at the California Institute of Technology, and Cartwright and Turner, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developed a process which was used extensively in World War II on optical instruments and camera lenses. This process is the coating of the finished spectacle

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