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Article
May 1948

MIOTIC AND ANTIGLAUCOMATOUS ACTIVITY OF TETRAETHYL PYROPHOSPHATE IN HUMAN EYES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;39(5):579-586. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900020588002
Abstract

THE OCULAR effects of a new anticholinesterase chemical, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, have been investigated in several subjects with normal eyes and in several patients with glaucomatous eyes. Although the number of observations is small, the information obtained appears to be adequate for a qualitative characterization of the actions of this compound. A more quantitative experimental comparison of tetraethyl pyrophosphate with physostigmine and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and a clinical comparison with di-isopropyl fluorophosphate in glaucomatous and in atropinized eyes are to be reported subsequently.1

Tetraethyl pyrophosphate is a colorless, water-soluble and lipidsoluble, hygroscopic liquid of low volatility. It is the principal active ingredient of a more complex substance, commercial hexaethyl tetraphosphate (tri-diethyl phosphophosphate), which, because of strong nicotine-like action, was used in Germany during the war as an insecticide, substituting for natural nicotine, under the name of ``bladan.''2 Tetraethyl pyrophosphate is being used increasingly in this country for the same

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