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Article
June 1948

INFECTION OF THE HUMAN EYE WITH CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS (TORULA HISTOLYTICA; CRYPTOCOCCUS HOMINIS)A Clinical and Experimental Study with a New Diagnostic Method

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Laboratory for Ophthalmic Research, Mount Zion Hospital, and the Department of Pathology, University of California Medical School.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;39(6):739-751. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900020749003
Abstract

SINCE slightly more than 100 cases of infection with Cryptococcus neoformans (Torula histolytica; Cryptococcus hominis) have been reported in the literature up to the present time, the disease should no longer be considered rare. The clinical, histopathologic and mycologic features have been adequately reviewed by Stoddard and Cutler,1 Freeman,2 Binford,3 Dodge,4 Benham5 and Cox and Tolhurst.6 Although a variety of ocular complications, including photophobia, diplopia, ptosis, rigidity of the pupils, amblyopia, strabismus, aniseikonia, nystagmus, neuroretinitis, papilledema, retinal hemorrhages, primary optic nerve atrophy and ophthalmoplegia, have been observed with a fair degree of regularity in this disease (Bettin7; Freeman2a; Holt8; Marshall and Teed9; Watts10; Reeves, Butt and Hammack11; Wade and Stevenson,12 and others), few ophthalmologists have had the opportunity to make the diagnosis13; and only one communication dealing with an orbital infection due to C. neoformans has

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