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Article
August 1948

INCIDENCE OF DEFECTIVE COLOR VISION AMONG PSYCHOTIC PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Knapp Memorial Laboratory, Institute of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;40(2):121-133. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900030126002
Abstract

INTEREST in the incidence of color blindness among psychotic patients has recently been aroused by the report in 1945 of Kaplan and Lynch1 from the Hudson County Hospital of Mental Diseases, Secaucus, N. J. These authors concluded that psychotic patients, both male and female, show a high incidence of defective color vision. Of a group of 223 male schizophrenic patients, for example, they claimed to find evidence of defective color vision in 32.8 per cent, and of a group of 148 female schizophrenic patients, in 4.8 per cent. The generally accepted values for incidence of anomalies in color vision among male and female persons of the white race are, in round numbers, respectively, 8 and 0.5 per cent. The incidence claimed by Kaplan and Lynch is, then, approximately four times as great in male and nine to ten times as great in female psychotic subjects as that among subjects

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