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Article
August 1948

DI-ISOPROPYL FLUOROPHOSPHATE (D F P) IN TREATMENT OF GLAUCOMAFurther Observations

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Wills Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;40(2):176-188. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900030181009
Abstract

DI-ISOPROPYL fluorophosphate (DFP) has been shown to have a marked and prolonged miotic effect in normal1 and in glaucomatous eyes.1b It has been shown to lower intraocular tension in these eyes. Furthermore, there is evidence that these effects are brought about entirely by inactivation of cholinesterase, and not by direct action on the iris and ciliary muscle.2 Although in this respect the pharmacologic effects of DFP resemble those of physostigmine and neostigmine, the DFP—cholinesterase combination is an irreversible one.3 None of the methods successfully employed to split physostigmine and cholinesterase will break down this combination. Because of these properties of DFP and, more especially, because of the prolonged effect of very dilute preparations when locally applied to the normal eye, this drug was tested for its efficacy in the therapy of glaucoma.1b

The initial studies indicated that DFP in 0.05 and 0.1 per cent concentrations

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