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Article
September 1948

OCULAR CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH SCRUB TYPHUSA Study of Four Hundred and Fifty-One Patients

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine PHILADELPHIA
Formerly Major, Medical Corps, Army of the United States.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;40(3):245-267. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900030251002
Abstract

VARIOUS OCULAR changes associated with scrub typhus (miteborne typhus tsutsugamushi fever) were described by me in reports submitted to the Office of the Surgeon General of the United States army in 1944 and 1945. Abstracts of these reports were released in the Bulletin of the United States Army Medical Department in April 19451 and April 1946.2 The external ocular changes consisted of conjunctival injection, occurring during the onset of the disease, and occasionally, subconjunctival hemorrhages, appearing during the first ten days. The intraocular changes, previously undescribed, were more noteworthy. The commonest, and most striking, of these was edema of the disk and retina, occurring during the second and third weeks of the disease and persisting well into convalescence. Retinal hemorrhages, usually superficial in type, and white, soft exudates occurred in a smaller number of patients. When these did occur, they were usually associated with edema of the disk

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