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Article
September 1948

EFFECT OF INTRAMUSCULAR ADMINISTRATION OF MORPHINE, ATROPINE, SCOPOLAMINE AND NEOSTIGMINE ON THE HUMAN EYE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, and Physiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;40(3):285-290. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900030291006
Abstract

A CONSIDERABLE amount of data has been collected concerning the effects of locally administered drugs on the human eye; the indications and contraindications for the use of such drugs are well known to members of the medical profession. On the other hand, information is limited as to the effects on the eye of these same drugs when administered systemically in their usual dosage. Patients with ocular diseases, such as glaucoma, may occasionally be given morphine or atropine for the treatment of a concomitant disease. General surgeons commonly use morphine, atropine, scopolamine and neostigmine in either the preoperative or the postoperative care of patients, without definite knowledge of the effect of these drugs on incidental diseases of the eye. Morphine is said to increase the intraocular pressure when administered systemically.1 This action would contraindicate its use in some cases of glaucoma.

Therefore, data were obtained concerning the effect of morphine

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