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Article
September 1948

DELAYED KERATITIS DUE TO MUSTARD GAS (DICHLORODIETHYL SULFIDE BURNS)Report of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

WATERTOWN, N. Y.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;40(3):291-301. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900030297007
Abstract

NO REPORT of delayed keratitis due to mustard gas (dichlorodiethylsulfide) burns among United States veterans of World War I appeared in the literature until the recent review of Scholz and Woods.1 However, many such cases have been reported in the British, French and German literature,2 so that the condition is a well recognized entity. Goulden3 stated that 51 men from the British army were blinded and 180 received pensions because of visual disability due to mustard gas in World War I.

There may not have been as many gas casualties in the Army of the United States as there were in the British army. However, a report4 from the Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Army estimates that 52,889 casualties due to mustard gas burns were admitted to hospitals. The corneas of some of these men undoubtedly were seriously affected, as were those

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