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Article
November 1948

INFECTION OF THE CORNEA DUE TO HERPES SIMPLEXAn Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

SYRACUSE, N. Y.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1948;40(5):531-552. doi:10.1001/archopht.1948.00900030544006
Abstract

ALL HERPETIC eruptions, with the exception of those of the virus of herpes zoster, are believed to be due to the same virus. The terms herpes simplex virus, herpes febrilis virus and herpes virus refer to the same agent.1 The commonest site of the herpetic lesion is on the lips, and the condition is therefore commonly referred to as herpes labialis. The genitals are not uncommonly involved in this type of lesion, and the eruption is then known as herpes genitalis. Aphthous stomatitis is frequently due to the herpes virus. Herpes cornealis is encountered frequently by the ophthalmologist in the form of herpetic or dendritic ulcer. The lesions of herpes tend to be recurrent, and some persons seem particularly predisposed to recurrent attacks. Frequently the lesions recur at the site of the primary lesion.

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS 

PROPERTIES OF THE VIRUS  Inoculation of human skin with vesicle fluid from any

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