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Article
July 1949

VISUAL ACUITY WHILE ONE IS VIEWING A MOVING OBJECT

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(1):14-22. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050017002
Abstract

FOVEAL visual acuity while one is viewing a moving object has received curiously little attention. In fact, the only reference to this subject which I have been able to find is a note by Langmuir1 in which, in an effort to estimate the speed of a deer botfly, he whirled above his head a piece of solder fastened to a string and noted at what speed the piece of solder appeared blurred. I have discussed this problem.2

There have been investigations of the minimum velocity perceptible as movement3 and the way in which this minimum velocity varies from center to periphery of the visual field.4 There have also been investigations of the minimum length of path which permits motion to be perceptible.5 Some have claimed6 that there is "visual anesthesia" while the eyes are voluntarily moving. Bethe's "Handbuch,"7 Duke-Elder,8 Troland9 and

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