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Article
July 1949

NONSYPHILITIC INTERSTITIAL KERATITIS WITH VESTIBULOAUDITORY SYMPTOMSReport of Four Additional Cases

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(1):42-49. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050045004
Abstract

IN 1945 I described 4 patients presenting a syndrome consisting of a characteristic type of interstitial keratitis and vestibuloauditory symptoms like those of Ménière's disease and resulting, usually, in complete deafness.1 Only 1 previous instance, and this one questionable, could be found from an examination of the literature. The ocular signs consisted early of a granular type of corneal infiltrate, patchy in distribution, situated predominantly in the posterior half of the cornea; late the cornea became vascularized. The keratitis was bilateral in 3 of the 4 patients and ran a characteristically chronic course, varying in its severity from day to day and from eye to eye. There was little or no reaction in the anterior chamber or the iris. The vestibuloauditory symptoms, coming on within a few days of the ocular symptoms, consisted typically of severe vertigo, tinnitus, nystagmus and rapidly progressive deafness. There was an elevated white blood

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