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Article
July 1949

AQUEOUS VEINS AND THEIR SIGNIFICANCE FOR PATHOGENESIS OF GLAUCOMA

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(1):66-76. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050069006
Abstract

DETECTION AND QUALITIES OF THE AQUEOUS VEINS  ALL OVER the body, fluid may leave or enter capillaries according to the relative values of tissue pressure and intravascular pressure and osmotic and colloidal osmotic pressure which prevail inside and outside the vessel walls. An individual capillary may yield tissue fluid in its proximal part and accept tissue fluid in its distal part.1 In the human eye, there is superimposed on this universal water exchange through the capillary endothelium a continuous gross circulation of fluid, with its source in the ciliary body and its goal in the chamber angle.2 From the angle of the anterior chamber fluid seeps through the trabecular meshwork into the canal of Schlemm, hence through the scleral venous meshwork and, finally, into conjunctival and episcleral veins, where it may become biomicroscopically visible.3 This circulation of fluid was postulated by Leber2a and his followers4

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