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Article
August 1949

CONTINUOUS INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF TYPHOID VACCINE IN TREATMENT OF CERTAIN OPHTHALMIC DISEASES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Robert Dawson Evans Memorial and the Ophthalmologic Service, Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(2):123-125. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050128002
Abstract

FOR MANY years artificial fever, induced in the hypertherm cabinet or by single injections of foreign protein or typhoid vaccine, has been used in the treatment of various diseases of the eye. In the past decade attention has been directed particularly toward the use of single, rapid intravenous injections of typhoid vaccine. A drawback of this type of therapy is the unpredictable febrile reaction. In some cases extremely severe chills and high fever occur, whereas in others several injections are required, over a period of days, before the proper degree of fever is secured. Moreover, typhoid therapy is frequently withheld from elderly patients or persons with heart disease because of the risk entailed in a severe reaction. Solomon and Somkin1 in 1942 introduced the method of controlled hyperpyrexia by the continous intravenous administration of typhoid vaccine. It occurred to us that this type of therapy might well be applied

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