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Article
October 1949

ANEURYSM OF THE POSTERIOR COMMUNICATING ARTERY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Neurology, Jefferson Medical College.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(4):353-364. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050361001
Abstract

THE growing interest in the clinical recognition of cerebral aneurysms, due largely to the promising possibilities of surgical treatment, demands elucidation of their characteristics for purposes of accurate diagnosis. For this reason we report a group of cases of aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery, in order to call attention to salient features for diagnosis, as well as to indicate the possibilities of treatment.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—History.  —C. S., a married man aged 59, a railroad car inspector, was admitted to the neurologic service of the Jefferson Hospital on April 18, 1947 with a history of having had the onset of right frontal headache seventeen days before admission. The headache was constant and was associated with buzzing in the head, ringing in the ears, impairment of vision and intermittent nausea. The headache gradually became more pronounced and ten days after onset was followed by vomiting and sudden

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