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Article
October 1949

CONDITIONED CORNEAL VASCULARITY IN RIBOFLAVIN DEFICIENCYReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

UTICA, N. Y.
From the Nutrition Clinic of the Department of Health of the City of New York, and the Special Eye Bank Clinic of the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, New York.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(4):438-442. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050446009
Abstract

IN 1940 Sydenstricker and his associates1 published their observations on corneal vascularization in man, which was similar to that described previously by Bessey and Wolbach2 in rats maintained on riboflavin-deficient diet. Since then a large number of papers on the subject have appeared, and the first enthusiastic response of confirmation soon made way to criticism and doubt; the latter trend, as happens frequently, shifted the general opinion far in the opposite direction, causing a number of workers to deny the existence of corneal vascularity as a result of ariboflavinosis in man. This negative attitude seems to have taken root to a certain extent in the collective mind of ophthalmologists.

Corneal vascularity caused by riboflavin deficiency is a clinical entity. It is probably true that it cannot be diagnosed by its morphologic aspect alone, although the appearance of regular, fine capillaries in the entire circumference of the cornea, which

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