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Article
November 1949

SUBCHOROIDAL EXPULSIVE HEMORRHAGE OCCURRING DURING THIOPENTAL SODIUM (SODIUM PENTOTHAL®) ANESTHESIAIts Treatment by Sclerotomy

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(5):562-566. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050572006
Abstract

EVERY ophthalmic surgeon, unfortunately, will experience, sooner or later, the occurrence of an expulsive hemorrhage in one or more of his patients after intraocular operation. It is a disastrous complication which probably cannot be foreseen, and for which there is little to be done when it does occur. The one form of treatment that has offered any hope of saving the eyeball at least is prompt incision of the sclera in the area of the hemorrhage and evacuation of the blood.

Posterior sclerotomy for this condition was first performed in 1915 by Verhoeff.1

His patient, a man aged 60, had bilateral chronic noninflammatory glaucoma. An iridectomy was performed on the right eye. Almost immediately thereafter vitreous began to pour from the wound. The eye became hard, and there was severe pain. Four hours later Verhoeff performed a sclerotomy to relieve the glaucoma. The first puncture with a Graefe knife

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