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Article
November 1949

INTRACAPSULAR EXTRACTION OF CATARACTA COMPLICATA ACCRETA AFTER IRIDOCYCLITIS AND GLAUCOMA

Author Affiliations

VIENNA, AUSTRIA
From the First University Eye Clinic.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(5):567-582. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050577007
Abstract

THE OPERATION for cataracta accreta following iridocyclitis, before the introduction of the intracapsular method by Arnold Knapp, was a source of anxiety to the surgeon and of danger to the patient's eye. Every surgeon who had to operate extracapsularly in cases of this type knows by experience how many eyes were destroyed by the recurrence of iridocyclitis and the hypotony and glaucoma often connected with it. Experienced cataract surgeons, therefore, because of the unfavorable prognosis, declined to undertake extraction in such cases, either on principle, thus condemning the patient to lasting practical blindness, or because they followed the advice of Axenfeld.1 This author suggested that in such cases one first do a total iridectomy, if it had not already been done, and, with Weber's loop, extract the cataracta complicata as a whole, if possible, so as to save the eye the postoperative recurrence of iridocyclitis caused by remnants of

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