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Article
November 1949

BILATERAL TOTAL OPHTHALMOPLEGIA WITH ADENOMA OF THE PITUITARY GLANDReport of Two Cases; an Anatomic Study

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1949;42(5):646-654. doi:10.1001/archopht.1949.00900050656014
Abstract

THE DIAGNOSIS of adenoma of the pituitary gland usually is made on the basis of one or more of three signs: changes in vision and visual fields, alterations in the sella turcica as demonstrated in roentgenograms and evidences of dyspituitarism. Until relatively recently cranial nerve palsies have not received the consideration they merit. During 1940 two noteworthy papers appeared, and they merit particular attention in this regard. Weinberger, Adler and Grant,1 after reviewing 169 case records of verified adenomas of the pituitary gland, selected 14 cases which exemplified involvement of the cavernous sinus; they stated that these 14 cases by no means represented the total incidence of palsies of the cranial nerves within the cavernous sinuses in the cases they studied. Jefferson2 described the symptomatology associated with extrasellar extensions of pituitary adenomas. A further communication containing detailed descriptions already available in these two papers would be superfluous. However,

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