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Article
January 1950

FLAKES OF IRIS PIGMENT ON POSTERIOR SURFACE OF CORNEA FOLLOWING CATARACT EXTRACTION

Author Affiliations

WATERTOWN, N. Y.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(1):32-35. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910010035003
Abstract

LARGE flakes of iris pigment are often dislodged during cataract extraction, particularly the intracapsular extraction. These flakes may be deposited on the anterior surface of the iris, the hyaloid membrane or the posterior surface of the cornea. They vary in size; some are small and of little importance, while others may be 1 mm. or more in diameter and present a problem. This is particularly true when there is a small round pupil and the flake of pigment is lodged on the posterior surface of the cornea directly in the pupillary area. In this location it causes visual disturbance and may constitute a serious complication.

Complications incident to cataract surgery have been exhaustively discussed and reviewed. Strangely enough, in all the voluminous literature on this subject, no mention has been found of large flakes of iris pigment being deposited on the posterior surface of the cornea and affecting vision. Now

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