[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1950

AN OPHTHALMOSCOPE FOR USE IN OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(2):373-375. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910010380015
Abstract

IT IS generally recognized that ophthalmoscopic control is a sine qua non for the surgical repair of retinal detachment. Both the direct and the indirect technics as usually practiced have well known disadvantages in the theater—loss of time with either method, danger of sepsis with the former.

The apparatus to be described was first devised for the removal of a cysticercus from the vitreous.1 Its application to the surgical treatment of other conditions followed automatically.

A head lamp for use in operations, like that commonly used by otolaryngologists, was fitted with a perforated mirror so that it was possible to look through the hole in the mirror along the axis of the reflected beam of light, as with an ophthalmoscope (fig. 1). It was subsequently found that a similar suitable apparatus is available commercially.2 A pair of + 4.0 D. sph. spectacles is worn. The upper and lower segments

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×