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Article
March 1950

EPITHELIAL INVASION OF ANTERIOR CHAMBER FOLLOWING CATARACT EXTRACTIONEffect of Radiation Therapy

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Long Island College Hospital and College of Medicine; Mortimer A. Lasky, M.D., Ophthalmologist in Chief (Acting).

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(3):509-519. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910010518011
Abstract

EPITHELIAL invasion of the anterior chamber is a most malignant postoperative complication of cataract extraction. Estimates of the incidence vary from 0.061 to 0.11 per cent.2 When one considers the number of cataract extractions that are performed by surgeons of varying abilities and with various methods, the incidence of this complication is remarkably low. Since this is an infrequent complication, the finding of 5 cases during the past two years merits report.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —Mr. P. J., aged 70, was examined at the Kings County Hospital. A mature cataract in the right eye and an immature cataract in the left eye were noted on routine ophthalmologic examination. The preoperative physical and laboratory studies3 revealed little of clinical significance.A preliminary iridectomy of the right eye was performed on Aug. 20, 1947. The patient was readmitted to the hospital for extraction of the cataract on

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