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Article
April 1950

TREATMENT OF OCCLUDED NASOLACRIMAL DUCTS IN INFANTS

Author Affiliations

SAN DIEGO, CALIF.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(4):750-754. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910010763013
Abstract

THE TREATMENT of occluded nasolacrimal ducts in infants apparently needs more discussion, for within sixty days the Archives published two articles advocating diametrically opposed managements of the condition. A brief résumé of these papers should recall the pertinent facts and disagreements on the subject.

Guerry and Kendig1 reviewed the literature. They found that most of the papers referred to the condition as congenital dacryocystitis or dacryostenosis and suggested that the malady be called congenital impatency of the nasolacrimal duct with or without dacryocystitis. In a study of 200 consecutive, unselected newborn infants, these authors found 12 with congenital "impatency," as manifested by epiphora and the presence of mucopus after pressure over the affected sac. The condition in these 12 patients was treated by the application of penicillin ointment and daily massage by the mother. The average duration of symptoms after the beginning of treatment was 2.3 months. After the

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