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Article
May 1950

TRANSPLANTATION OF LACRIMAL GLANDS IN MAN AND RAT; EFFECT OF INJURY OF LACRIMAL DUCT IN RATClinical and Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

HELSINKI, FINLAND
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(5):804-812. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910010819002
Abstract

LITTLE is known about the effect of operation on the lacrimal gland, and no reports are available on transplantation of this organ, in contrast to the vast literature on surgical procedures on other parts of the lacrimal apparatus. Obviously, the subject not only is of theoretic interest but has important practical aspects. Disturbances in the secretion of tears are of two types: In one type, the eyes are dry, owing to lack of tears; in the other, there appears to be an overproduction of tears. The question whether deficient secretion can be corrected by substitution of the glandular tissue with transplants from the lacrimal glands of the second type has not been studied. With this possibility in mind, I attempted to graft the palpebral portion of the lacrimal gland from healthy persons with annoying epiphora to the eyes of patients with advanced corneal and conjunctival xerosis due to old trachoma.

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