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Article
May 1950

INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS COMPLICATED BY BILATERAL PAPILLORETINAL EDEMAReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pathology, University of Vermont College of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(5):853-856. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910010868009
Abstract

DURING the last fifteen years the literature on infectious mononucleosis has increased greatly,1 and with this addition has come the realization that the signs and symptoms of the disease are manifold and its clinical behavior not always predictable. In 1941 Thelander and Shaw2 reviewed the cerebral complications but did not mention papilloretinal edema. In 1948 Tidy3 reviewed the neurologic findings, but likewise did not mention retinal edema. Ashworth and Motto4 in 1947 reported a case of infectious mononucleosis complicated by bilateral papilloretinal edema in the absence of a clinical picture of meningitis or encephalitis. No other reports in which papilloretinal edema was one of the major features have since appeared. The following case was of considerable interest to us because of the confusion of the history that colored the differential diagnosis. The laboratory data and the subsequent progression of clinical events substantiated the diagnosis of infectious

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