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Article
May 1950

A MODIFIED FILM CARRIER FOR THE ZEISS-NORDENSON FUNDUS CAMERA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Institute of Ophthalmology of the Presbyterian Hospital and the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(5):910-911. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910010925017
Abstract

Fundus photography offers an important means whereby retinal lesions can be reproduced on film for study and as a medical record. The Zeiss-Nordenson retinal camera has been the instrument most commonly used in this country. Bedell,1 Koch2 and others have discussed the use of this instrument in detail. The cameras were originally designed to use cassettes holding 4.5 by 6 mm. plates. These cassettes were later modified to use bantam type, 35 mm., 8 exposure roll film (either black and white or colored). When large numbers of exposures are made, the use of 8 exposure film requires frequent changes. Furthermore, the method of adapting the cassettes to hold roll film was not too secure, and there was a tendency for the film to jam, requiring that the cassette be opened in total darkness and the film removed.

To correct this, we arranged to have a new cassette constructed

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