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Article
June 1950

CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN OCULAR TISSUES AND FLUIDS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Institute of Ophthalmology, Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;43(6):1004-1025. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910011021005
Abstract

BECAUSE of recent advances in the knowledge of the functional importance of cholinesterase, it was considered advisable to investigate this enzyme from the ophthalmologic point of view. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and to present new experimental data on the activity of cholinesterase in various ocular tissues and fluids, both in the experimental animal and in man.

I. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE 

A. GENERAL LITERATURE  Since Loewi's1 fundamental discovery in 1921 of a parasympathomimetic substance in the perfusion fluid passed through a dog's heart, literally thousands of papers have been published pertaining to this parasympathomimetic substance—acetylcholine—and its specific enzyme, cholinesterase. The existence of such an enzyme was first demonstrated by Loewi and Navratil,2 and the Stedmans,3 in 1932, gave it the present name of cholinesterase. The most important chemical and physiologic characteristics of cholinesterase have been well summarized in several review articles

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