[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.144.194.161. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1950

PENETRATION OF CHLORAMPHENICOL U. S. P. (CHLOROMYCETIN®) INTO THE EYE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Research Laboratories of the Wills Hospital and Harrison Department of Surgical Research, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;44(1):22-36. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910020025002
Abstract

THE NUMBER of antibiotic agents is constantly increasing. At present there are available, at least for clinical investigation, the following antibiotics: penicillin; streptomycin; dihydrostreptomycin; neomycin; polymyxin B, or aerosporin; tyrothricin; bacitracin; aureomycin, and chloramphenicol U. S. P. (D-[—]-threo-2-dichloroacetamido-1-para-nitrophenyl-1,3-propanediol), also known as chloromycetin.® Many other new antibiotics are still not ready for clinical investigation but are under study at the present time. It appears that more antibiotics will rapidly become available in the future. Many factors keep the problem of antibiotic therapy from being a simple one. A few years ago it was easy to decide which antibiotic to use in a particular case on the basis of whether the infecting organism was gram-positive or gram-negative. Now, however, one must choose between several antibiotics for gram-positive organisms, several for gram-negative organisms and still others for viruses and rickettsias. One must now decide which antibiotic will be the most effective,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×