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Article
August 1950

CERVICAL SYMPATHECTOMY IN NONSYPHILITIC INTERSTITIAL KERATITIS WITH VESTIBULOAUDITORY SYMPTOMSReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

TACOMA, WASH.

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;44(2):243-244. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910020250006
Abstract

IN 1945 Cogan1 described the syndrome of nonsyphilitic interstitial keratitis and vestibuloauditory symptoms in 4 cases and later2 reported 4 additional cases. Rosen3 reported a similar case occurring after vaccination. A search of the literature reveals only 1 other case, reported in 1934 by Moran and Baumgartner.4 They considered their case to be one of "Ménière's disease complicated by interstitial keratitis," and reported improvement following cervical ganglionectomy. Cogan2 stated that it is "questionable" whether Moran and Baumgartner's case belongs to this group.

The syndrome consists of predominantly bilateral keratitis running a chronic course, the severity varying from day to day and from eye to eye. The vestibuloauditory symptoms are typically severe vertigo, tinnitus, nystagmus and progressive deafness. The course of the disease, the absence of a familial history and the consistently negative serologic reactions are important parts of the syndromes.

Moran and Baumgartner reported dramatic

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