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Article
September 1950

CILIUM IN THE ANTERIOR CHAMBERReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, of the Post-Graduate Medical School and the University Hospital (New York University-Bellevue Medical Center).

Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;44(3):424-428. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910020433011
Abstract

THE FEAR of infection following penetrating wounds has been lessened considerably since the introduction of antibiotic and chemotherapeutic agents. Ten years ago failure to excise an iris prolapse would have been frowned on as malpractice. The deforming pear-shaped pupil that resulted was deemed a small premium to pay against intraocular infection.

The good cosmetic result achieved in my patient without excision indicates that bad practice in 1940 may be considered good practice in 1950.

Search of the literature reveals that questionable practice still exists regarding perforating injuries which lodge cilia in the anterior chamber. Despite the complications that follow such accidents, many ophthalmologists do not remove the lashes. We have not advanced far since 1924, when a colleague closed his published report on a cilium in the anterior chamber with the statement, "Nothing, of course, was done with it."1

HISTORY OF CASE  J. D., a white man aged 23,

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