[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.92.239.248. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1950

AMINO ACID COMPOSITION OF TISSUE PROTEINS OF THE CORNEA, SCLERA, VITREOUS AND RETINA

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1950;44(6):833-841. doi:10.1001/archopht.1950.00910020846006
Abstract

A HISTORICAL survey of the available information on the biochemistry of the eye in Krause's monograph1 shows a slow, progressive evolution. This knowledge concerning the protein chemistry of the cornea is relatively poor, and the information of earlier authors is of little value, as they are dated prior to the era of the protein chemistry opened by Fischer's ester method.

Quantitatively, the corneal tissue consists chiefly of the substantia propria, and, logically, most attention was given to that part. One of the earlier investigators, Müller,2 found that it consists basically of collagen. Because of its physical characteristics, the protein reminded him of the basic substance of the cartilage, and he called it chondrogen. The investigations of Bruns,2 His,2 Fubini2 and Morochowetz2 moved on a similar plane, until Mörner3 offered more definite details. He found that the corneal tissue contains mainly collagen, with a

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×