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Article
March 1951

PHYSIOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF ACTH AND CORTISONE THERAPY WITH REFERENCE TO OPHTHALMOLOGY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Rush Department of Medicine of the Presbyterian Hospital of the City of Chicago and the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1951;45(3):251-257. doi:10.1001/archopht.1951.01700010257002
Abstract

IN PRESENTING this study on ACTH and cortisone, we thought it wise, in accordance with the advice of Dr. Justin Donegan, to describe briefly these products from a chemical and biologic viewpoint and then to turn to their physiological properties relevant to their use in ophthalmologic problems. Certain of these properties work for healing; others, unless proper safeguards are taken, give rise to complications.

CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGIC ASPECTS  ACTH, as the initials imply, is an adrenocorticotropic hormone. Formed in the pituitary, the currently available products are extracted from hog and beef glands, separated from other hormones and concentrated by the comparatively tedious methods of the protein chemist. ACTH, like other pituitary "-tropic" hormones (e. g., thyrotropic and gonadotropic), is a protein.1Synthetic production of ACTH has not been achieved, although activity has been demonstrated in some peptide fractions of low molecular weight containing only about eight amino acid residues.

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