[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.19.31. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1951

USE OF ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE AND CORTISONE IN OCULAR DISEASE

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1951;45(3):274-300. doi:10.1001/archopht.1951.01700010280004
Abstract

OPHTHALMOLOGISTS have used nonspecific foreign protein therapy for years in the treatment of a variety of ocular lesions. As previously reported,1 it was our belief that the benefit derived from this form of therapy could be attributed in part to the release of endogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone with an acceleration of mechanisms normally evoked in stress states. It has been shown by Sayers and Sayers2 that both heat and killed typhoid organisms, among many factors, produce changes in the adrenal cortex of the experimental animal which are characteristic of the general response to stress. The same type of changes can be produced by the injection of adrenocorticotropic hormone. Talbot3 and Venning4 and their associates and others have shown a significant increase in the urinary excretion of 11-oxysteroids and 17-ketosteroids following a variety of stress states, such as trauma and surgical procedures. Forsham,5 Mason,6 and Sprague and associates7 and others have

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×