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Article
June 1951

RELATION OF DIPLOPIA TO BINOCULAR VISION IN CONCOMITANT STRABISMUS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Montefiore Hospital for Chronic Diseases.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1951;45(6):615-622. doi:10.1001/archopht.1951.01700010628001
Abstract

POSTOPERATIVE diplopia is usually regarded as a good prognostic sign because it presumably indicates an attempt at resumption of binocular function. Nevertheless, it can become, at times, a troublesome complication in the management of a case of strabismus. This problem has occupied the attention of ophthalmologists ever since von Graefe1 wrote his monograph on postoperative diplopia in strabismus. In von Graefe's day, when the operation for strabismus consisted in tenotomy, the problem assumed greater importance because of the relative frequency of overcorrection. An additional factor may have been the tendency of surgeons to refrain from operating until the patient reached adulthood. With modern surgical techniques, postoperative diplopia, sufficient to become obtrusive, has become less frequent; but when it does occur it constitutes a serious problem both for the patient and for the ophthalmologist.

For clinical purposes, postoperative diplopia in concomitant strabismus may be classified as follows:

Diplopia occurring in

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