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Article
June 1951

OCULAR COMPLICATIONS ENCOUNTERED IN INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOGRAPHY

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1951;45(6):623-626. doi:10.1001/archopht.1951.01700010636002
Abstract

INTRACRANIAL angiography,1 the roentgenographic examination of the skull following the perfusion of intracranial vessels, has become an established routine in the diagnostic armamentarium of the neurosurgeon. The procedure provides an excellent means of obtaining diagnostic information in cases of suspected intracranial aneurysm and anomalies of intracranial vasculature and in selected cases of arterial occlusion and expanding cerebral lesions.

That angiography is not without danger is freely admitted by most neurosurgeons. Complications, such as pain, arterial spasm, allergic phenomena, thrombosis, emboli, convulsions, hemiplegia, exacerbation of existing symptoms, and even death, may be encountered. It is of interest that, except for an occasional reference to the eye, there is a remarkable lack of reported ocular complications. Weekers,2 however, has reported a case of occlusion of the right temporal retinal artery following injection of the right internal carotid artery with 20 cc. of iodopyracet solution ("umbradil"). The patient also presented a

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