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Article
June 1951

OCCLUSION OF CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN IN MIGRAINE

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1951;45(6):678-682. doi:10.1001/archopht.1951.01700010693010
Abstract

MIGRAINE is a symptom complex most commonly described as an intense recurrent headache, usually paroxysmal, usually unilateral, the outstanding features of which are the associated gastrointestinal and ocular symptoms. The usual visual disturbances accompanying migraine are premonitory and transitory flashes of brilliant spectral lights, followed by homonymous scotomas. Persistent ocular complications may be observed during all phases of the attack, various components of the eye being affected singly or in combinations. Oculomotor paralysis, the so-called ophthalmoplegic migraine, has been reported as occurring with and subsequent to the headache. Hemiplegia and hemianopsia have been found to persist after attacks of migraine,1 but permanent visual disturbance is rare. The common ocular complications of migraine, together with the theories of their production, have been excellently reported by Donahue.2

REVIEW OF LITERATURE  There have been reports of permanent visual loss associated with retinal vascular changes after an attack of migraine. Galezowski (1882)

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