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Article
January 1952

CARCINOMA OF BULBAR CONJUNCTIVA FOLLOWING CATARACT EXTRACTIONReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;47(1):78-80. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.01700030081009
Abstract

While carcinoma involving the bulbar conjunctiva at or near the limbus is not infrequent, it is of unusual interest when it occurs after cataract extraction as a complication thereof. Tumors of the bulbar conjunctiva are located most commonly temporally and within the palpebral aperture.1 According to Benedict2 and Ash and Wilder,3 occurrence of these tumors is commonest in elderly men.

Because of the merging of two types of epithelium at the limbus, this area is the site of predilection for development of epitheliomas. As compared with carcinoma elsewhere, the usual epithelioma at the limbus is of relatively low malignancy and penetration. The transition between and clinical differentiation of inflammatory hyperplasia and true neoplasms is often vague.4

It has been suggested that injury frequently enters into the etiology of epithelioma of the limbus, and in many cases a history of previous trauma may be elicited.5 Epithelioma

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