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Article
March 1952

STELLATE-GANGLION BLOCK IN RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
Former Fellow, now practicing in Lakewood, Ohio (Dr. McGannon).; From the Cleveland Clinic and the Frank E. Bunts Educational Institute.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;47(3):287-291. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.01700030295003
Abstract

FOR SOME time the value of cervical sympathectomy and cervical sympathetic block in the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa has been disputed. The beneficial results have been inconclusive, and the question has been raised as to whether the benefits derived from such measures are psychologic or organic.

For the purpose of evaluating the use of cervical sympathetic block in retinitis pigmentosa, we subjected a group of patients to cervical sympathetic block, first using procaine hydrochloride, and later we repeated the procedure using saline solution instead of procaine.

ANATOMIC BASIS OF SYMPATHETIC SURGERY  The preganglionic fibers arise from the intermediolateral tract of the gray matter of the spinal cord in the ciliospinal center of Budge. They concentrate in the stellate ganglion (a fusion of the inferior cervical and the first thoracic ganglion) and pass through the middle to the superior cervical ganglion.The majority of fibers travel with the carotid artery, breaking

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