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Article
March 1952

STUDIES ON THE INTRAOCULAR PENETRATION AND TOXICITY OF TERRAMYCIN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Research Laboratories of the Wills Hospital and the Harrison Department of Surgical Research, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;47(3):344-349. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.01700030352008
Abstract

TERRAMYCIN, an antibiotic with a broad antibacterial spectrum, is an elaboration product of the actinomycete Streptomyces rimosus.1 Investigators2 have reported on the effectiveness of terramycin in the treatment of bacterial, viral, rickettsial, and protozoan diseases. Welch and associates3 have reported on the absorption, distribution, and excretion of this antibiotic after systemic administration to man and the experimental animal. The toxic properties have been investigated by Schoenbach, Bryer, and Long.4 The present study was undertaken to evaluate the penetrability of terramycin into the ocular fluids and tissues after local and systemic administration. Additional experiments were devised to study the toxic effects of terramycin on ocular tissues. Since this study was undertaken, reports on the intraocular penetration of terramycin and its clinical effectiveness have appeared.5

GENERAL PROCEDURE 

Local Administration.  —Solutions: Drops of terramycin hydrochloride in aqueous solution in concentrations of 5 and 25 mg. per cubic centimeter

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