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Article
April 1952

SUBHYALOID HEMORRHAGE AND EXOPHTHALMOS DUE TO RUPTURED INTRAVENTRICULAR ANEURYSMA Case Occurring in Toxemia of Pregnancy

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;47(4):470-476. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.01700030480009
Abstract

A SUBHYALOID hemorrhage is an intraocular collection of blood that remains contained in a self-created, previously nonexistent space, usually between the posterior limiting layer of the vitreous and the retina. Thus it is entirely separate and distinct from the intraretinal hemorrhage, associated, e. g., with hypertension and diabetes, and from the vitreous hemorrhage, of traumatic or diabetic origin.

Subhyaloid (or preretinal) hemorrhage is rare. The first case was reported by Liebreich1 in 1863, and others have been recorded, although infrequently.2

The intraocular pathology was at first believed to stem from the arteries,3 but later papers4 indicate the venous origin of the subhyaloid hemorrhage, an explanation which is undoubtedly the true one.

Clinically, subhyaloid hemorrhages are seen as dark-red masses, which most frequently are circular, occur at the posterior pole, and are usually extensive. They may be single, in which case the hemorrhage is large, up to

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