[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1952

EXPERIMENTAL RADIATION CATARACTII. Cataract in the Rabbit Following Single Exposure to Fast Neutrons

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; LOS ALAMOS, N. M.
From the Los Alamos Medical Center, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the University of California, Los Alamos, N. M., and the Howe Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School (Dr. Cogan); Los Alamos Medical Center and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the University of California (Dr. Goff), and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the University of California (Dr. Graves).

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;47(5):584-592. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.01700030598004
Abstract

RADIATION cataracts which have occurred in cyclotron workers and in persons exposed to the atomic bombs are said to have been caused, in part at least, by the fast-neutron component of the radiation.1 It is therefore of considerable practical moment to know the cataractogenic dose of neutrons as exactly as possible under a variety of conditions and to compare the neutron effects on the lens with those on other tissues and with the effects of other forms of radiation.

The biologic action of neutrons has been studied in a variety of tissues, ranging from such relatively simple systems as hatching Drosophila eggs and germinating wheat seedlings2 to carcinoma in human beings.3 It is generally conceded that neutrons have much the same qualitative effect on tissue as do x-rays and other ionizing radiations,4 but the effects produced by different amounts of neutron radiation do not necessarily vary

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×