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Article
July 1952

ABERRANT INTRAOCULAR ADENOMATA AND EPITHELIZATION OF THE ANTERIOR CHAMBER

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE

AMA Arch Ophthalmol. 1952;48(1):19-29. doi:10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010022003
Abstract

THE ABERRANT occurrence of congenital gland-like tissue about the eye and its adnexa is rare, and until recently its intraocular occurrence has never been reported. Generally such malformations have been classified as benign adenomas and most commonly have occurred subconjunctivally on the upper anterior segment of the globe at various sites between the limbus and the equator.1 Apparently, these implants originate either from the glands of Krause and Wolfring or, more likely, from the same anlage as these glands in the embryonic conjunctiva. That such displacement is not limited to a single subconjunctival plane has recently been shown by two unrelated reports of the congenital occurrence of gland-like tissue in the cornea and iris, respectively.2 Histologically the aberrant glandular tissue in these two cases differed in no appreciable manner from that found in normal lacrimal or accessory lacrimal glands and was presumed by the authors to have the

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